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Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Strawberry Syrup



I had a request for strawberry syrup,
so I went to my friend Jay at Willard Farms


They smelled delicious, and the hubby could not resist eating a few off the top on the ride back home. Once home, the prepping begins. It takes quite a while to clean and chop two gallons of strawberries!

The syrup recipe is a simple one and can be used to make any flavor syrup you would like to try. I've made Blueberry and Blackberry already. Now strawberry, and I think I'll make cherry next. They are great to have on hand for pancakes, crepes, ice cream, yogurt and much more!

Basic Syrup

1 cup fruit
3/4 cup sugar
1/3 cup water

Clean and chop fruit. Combine fruit water and sugar. Bring to a boil, then simmer until thickened.* (about 20-30 minutes) Cool and pour in jars. Store in the refrigerator or process in a water-bath for 10 minutes for pints and 15 minutes for quarts.
*The request I had for syrup was to leave the fruit in the syrup, but you can strain it out if you like.

I also made some strawberry ice cream using
Strawberry Ice Cream with Strawberry Syrup






Shared on Meal Plan Monday 

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Blackberry Syrup



A little over a month ago I had a customer send me a message... " I ate some stuff at a place and you poured it out and it was like blueberry syrup and it had whole blueberries in it you could put it over pancakes it was like a syrup that you poured over pancakes and it was floating in blueberries ...do you know how to make that?" Sure! I can do that! So he ordered 6 QUARTS of Blueberry Syrup! LOL

Apparently, that inspired him because he also wants 3 quarts of Blackberry Syrup and 3 quarts of Strawberry Syrup.



Blackberry Syrup with whole berries!


3 cups fresh blackberries
1 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 cup water

Add blackberries, sugar, lemon juice and water to a medium sauce pan over medium heat. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally, and boil until the temperature reaches 225 degrees. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly before use. Transfer to a quart jar and store in the refrigerator for up to 6 months.
*

*You can process the quarts in a waterbath for 15 minutes and store in your pantry.


Blueberry Syrup

Blueberry Syrup

A little over a month ago I had a customer send me a message... " I ate some stuff at a place and you poured it out and it was like blueberry syrup and it had whole blueberries in it you could put it over pancakes it was like a syrup that you poured over pancakes and it was floating in blueberries ...do you know how to make that?" Sure! I can do that! So he ordered 6 QUARTS of Blueberry Syrup! LOL
Usually it takes double the berries to make the amount of syrup you want, but since he wants whole berries in the syrup that helps with the volume. However, if you don't want the whole berries in your syrup, remember you will need twice the fruit for the yeild you want.

 This is 6 pounds of blueberries, water and sugar.

 Boil until the temperature reaches 225 degrees.

Yeilds 6 quarts of Blueberry Syrup
including whole berries.


Blueberry Syrup


  • 1 1/2 pounds blueberries
  • 4 cups water
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
In a pot, combine the blueberries with 1 cup of the water. Crush the berries with a potato masher and bring to a simmer. Simmer over low heat for 15 minutes. Strain the juice into a heatproof measuring cup, pressing hard on the solids. Discard the solids or use for jam. Add the sugar and the remaining 3 cups of water and bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Boil the syrup over moderate heat until it registers 225 on a candy thermometer, about 20 minutes. Add the blueberry juice and lemon juice and boil over high heat for 1 minute. Let the syrup cool. Pour the syrup into just-cleaned bottles. Seal and refrigerate for up to 6 months. *

*You can process the quarts in a waterbath for 15 minutes and store in your pantry.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Re-purposed Onions! LOL

Have you ever pulled out your onion drawer, bag or basket and found they all have sprouted green tops? Sure! What do you do? If the onion isn't rotten in spots, I go ahead and use/cook it. What if it's a little too far gone for that? I peel the dead pieces away until I get to the last green stalk. Sometimes one onion will yield several sprouts. I did this today. The pieces of onion that I peeled away are going to be caramelized and added to gravy and topped on hamburgers and hot dogs. Nothing goes to waste here!

I harvested 7 onion plants from 3 onions.

I used empty water bottles cut in half for the taller shoots
and one about 2 inches deep for the smaller shoots.
Sit the shoots in water.

In a few days, the shoots will have roots!
This one should have been planted a few days ago,
but we got sidetracked. It will be planted today!

These are the peelings I got from the "rotten" onions.

I cut them up and sauted them for burgers.





Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Quick Pickled Radishes

This month the Food in Jars Mastery Challenge was Quick Pickles. Quick pickles are also known as refrigerator pickles. They are simply vegetables that are pickled in a vinegar, water, and salt (sometimes sugar) solution and stored in the refrigerator.Quick pickling is also a brilliant solution for preserving a variety of vegetables from the market or your own garden. Quick pickling doesn't require canning or a bushel of vegetables. Best of all, you can adapt this simple formula for any fresh vegetables; try a mixture of vinegars and spices for a truly custom pickle pleasure.

I like to use up leftovers for this method, this passed weekend I made some cucumber and radish appetizers for our Annual Easter Party and had a bag of radishes left over. I decided to quick pickle them since I'm the only one here that eats them.



Quick Pickled Radishes

1 cup white or apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup water (optional... I like stronger vinegar flavor)

1 tablespoon sugar (also optional)
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 small bag radishes, thinly sliced

Whisk first 4 ingredients in a small bowl until sugar and salt dissolve. Place red onion in a jar; pour vinegar mixture over. Cover and chill. Store in the refrigerator. 



Quick Pickled Garlic

This month the Food in Jars Mastery Challenge was Quick Pickles. Quick pickles are also known as refrigerator pickles. They are simply vegetables that are pickled in a vinegar, water, and salt (sometimes sugar) solution and stored in the refrigerator.Quick pickling is also a brilliant solution for preserving a variety of vegetables from the market or your own garden. Quick pickling doesn't require canning or a bushel of vegetables. Best of all, you can adapt this simple formula for any fresh vegetables; try a mixture of vinegars and spices for a truly custom pickle pleasure.

I like to use up leftovers for this method, but this time, I bought a pound of garlic and decided to quick pickle it to have it on hand for months to come. I pop a couple of cloves out the frig and run them through my press and add them to sauces, dips and dressings.



It all starts with:
1 pound of garlic


 Separate the cloves...

 This yields about 3 1/2 cups of garlic cloves...

 Next, peel the cloves. Do not smash them.
If you'd like, you can blanch them for about 2 to 3 minutes,
and then transfer them to an ice bath.
The skins should peel right off.

 Peeled garlic cloves...

 Divide the garlic between 2 clean prepared pint jars
or 4 half pints... Depending on how often you use it.
I use bunches, so I used pints.


Quick Pickled Garlic

1 1/2 cups red wine vinegar
1/2 cup water (or more to taste... I like stronger vinegar flavor.)

1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 lb Garlic Heads

Whisk first 3 ingredients in a small bowl until salt dissolves. Place garlic in a jars; pour vinegar mixture over. Cover and chill. Store in the refrigerator. 




Cucumber and Radish Appetizers ~ Two Ways


This passed weekend was our Annual Adult Easter Egg Hunt Party, and the food was always a hit. We did an informal hamburger and hot dog spread, but had a little of the fancy-shmancy stuff too. There was potato salad, slaw and deviled eggs to name a few of the sides, but the appetizers were a hit. Here are the recipes for the Cucumber ~ Radish Bites.

Herbed Cream Cheese Cucumber and Radish Appetizers
(on the long tray)

4 oz cream cheese, softened
2 tablespoons mayonaise
1/2 teaspoon dill weed
2 teaspoons ranch dressing mix
1/2 teaspoon finely grated fresh lemon zest
1/8 teaspoon table salt
Pinch of cayenne, or to taste
1-2 medium pickling cucumber
3 medium radishes
1 teaspoons minced fresh basil

and Kosher salt for sprinkling

Stir together cream cheese, herbs, zest, lemon juice, table salt, and cayenne.
Slice 32 (1/8-inch-thick) rounds from cucumber with a mandolin. Trim bottoms from radishes, then slice into 32 (1/16-inch-thick) rounds with a mandolin. Top each cucumber slice with 1/2 teaspoon herbed cream cheese and top with a radish slice. Sprinkle with coarse sea salt and basil serve immediately.




Pimento Cheese Cucumber and Radish Appetizers
(on the small plate)

1 lb Extra Sharp Cheddar Cheese, grated
1 8oz package Cream Cheese, softened
1 cup diced Pimento
1 cup Mayonnaise
2 tablespoons onion, grated
1 teaspoon garlic powder
Salt and Cayenne Pepper, to taste

Combine all the ingredients, mixing well. Refrigerate 2 to 3 hours for flavors to mix.
Prepare the cucumbers and radishes as in the recipe above, but use my pimento cheese spread instead. (With this recipe, you will have a generous plenty of pimento cheese for sandwiches or as a dip for crackers.)





Shared on Meal Plan Monday